Something Borrowed, Something New

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When it comes to crafting, I love to take an existing idea or technique and merge it with my own new spin on it.

Crafting is somewhat like a wedding.  We are married to what we love.  We create an alliance with supplies, videos, magazines, and things we see in stores on display, giving us daily inspiration to make something similar.  Our passion could be for sewing, painting, journaling, jewelry making, and so forth, and we could merge the works of all the above to create a wonderful masterpiece

So, I took something borrowed, like a brilliant tutorial I have seen on YouTube, with Arty maze, and create something new with what I have learned from it.  In this instance I watched “*Junk In The Trunk* #20 Spring Tags…” and I saw how Arty took some playing cards and repurposed them.  They were the perfect size that I needed to create three cards for a  swap I am in with the Facebook group, “Junk Journal Buddies.”   

I took three playing cards, sanded them down with a sanding block, added some white acrylic paint to them (since I had run out of gesso) and let them dry.  Next, I added some Tim Holtz, Ranger, Distress oxide inks(Broken China, and Peeled Paint)  I rubbed the inks onto my glass mat, spritzed it with water, and brushed the colors onto the cards. 

I then found a piece of pink die cut floral paper and cut them into sections, painted them white, and glued them with some cheesecloth to the cards to form tuck spots.

Next, I took some scraps of papers and images, fussy cut them out and added them to the front and backs of the cards, including some tuck spots and sentiments.

It was a very fun project to make something new from something borrowed.  I hope this brief process was helpful!

To see the complete assembly of the cards, check out my YouTube video on it.  Happy crafting!

This is the process video on how I made these journaling cards

Disclaimer: If you purchase something from some of the links I will receive a monetary percentage of the cost of your item. Thanks.

Digital File Storage

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If you love scrapbooking and junk journaling, then you have probably acquired quite a bit of beautiful papers and elements.  Some may be physical purchases from brand names such as Graphic45 , BoBunny Tim Holtz The Paperstash, Stamperia, and many others. You may have also purchased digital downloads from etsy,or other websites.  Many digital files are even free! They can come from websites or even Facebook and include papers, envelopes, tags, bookmarks, graphics, and other pretty ephemera.

Some Free files are for personal use, while others are for commercial use. The illustration to the left is a freebie file found on Facebook. It is for commercial use. This would be a great kit to add to your digital collections! To access it click on the Facebook link and follow the prompts.

We often talk about how we store our purchased and freebie physical papers and ephemera using drawers, rolling carts, boxes, racks and more. 

So, what do you do with all your digital collections?  Do you organize them by brand name?  Or, do you save them in folders based on themes, such as “Shabby chic”, “Rustic”, “Industrial”, “Whimsical”, and more?  It certainly does not take long to start out with just a handful of options and end up with a hard drive filled with various files, making it very hard to find what you need when you need it most.  I’ve come across files that I had forgotten I owned. 

I tend to keep some of my files based on purchased versus free and commercial use license versus personal use.  Since I am a digital designer who sells various graphics, I need to know which files I am legally able to use to create and disburse my own.  

Also, do you store your files on your laptop or computer, or do you keep them on a cloud drive or portable drive?  These are very important things to consider.  The more graphics and data you use, the more space is taken up, and slows down your device.  I personally keep my files on the cloud.  I do that since I can access them anywhere if I have wifi.  I will eventually get a portable drive, such as the Samsung Portable SDD T5.  These storage gadgets are great for holding data, especially huge photo and video files.  This would help to save my computer disk space, making my laptop run more efficiently.

No matter how you keep your crafts and access them, just have fun with it.  Long as you know where to find what you need, that is all that matters. 

Happy crafting!!

Disclaimer:

If you click on some of the links and purchase something through it, I will received a monetary percentage of the cost of your order. Thanks!

Digital Scrap-booking: Quality Tips – Checking Gamut in Adobe Photoshop

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It is very important to identify when images are out of gamut before completing digital scrapbook projects. Why? The answer is simple. But first you must understand what a gamut is.

 A gamut is the color range or scope of colors that monitor systems display and printer structures print. If an image is out of gamut, it may not print in the colors shown on your system’s screen.  In Adobe Photoshop, there are various color modes to create your project in, but for digital scrapbooking prints, the two most used modes are RGB and CMYK.   RGB color mode is the more practical choice, since you can check to see if images are in or out of gamut.

Checking for Gamut Issues

The way to check for gamut issues is to do the following:

 On the menu bar click “View” > “Gamut Warning” or use your keyboard shortcuts [Shift + Ctrl (Command on a Mac) + Y].  If the image has grayed out areas, then it is out of gamut.  If the color values did not change, then they are within the color scope and your image should print fine. 

Correcting Out of Gamut Images

Out of gamut images can be fixed by converting it from RGB color mode to CMYK, then back to RGB.  On the menu bar, click “Image” > “Mode”> “CMYK color mode”. 

When you do this, a dialogue box opens with a message that states, “You are about to convert to CMYK using the “U.S. Web Coated (SWOP) v2” profile.  This may not be what you intended.  To use a different profile choose edit > Convert to Profile.”  

Click “ok” and your image will convert, ridding all the graphic of gray areas that were not in gamut. Then revert to RGB color, using the same methods of conversion applied from the “Image” menu (“Image” > “Mode”> RGB color mode).

Fixed image in gamut and RGB color mode

Be aware that some details of the image may be lost during conversion.  CMYK colors are typically the brighter, more neon colors.  If your image is out of gamut and is converted to within the RGB color range, the final edit may not appear as bright.  This should fix your gamut issues.

I hope this tip was helpful.  Happy crafting!